Teaching

Teaching/Executive Development

Teaching
 
IE Business School
Business, Government and Sustainability (Exec. MBA, MBA)
Nonmarket Strategy and Sustainability (Masters in Management)
Global Strategy (MBA)
Implementing and Changing Strategy (MBA)
Readings in Nonmarket Strategy (Ph.D.)
INSEAD
International Political Analysis (MBA) 
Business and Society: Political Environment (MBA)
Executive Development
 
Through IE Business School and Headspring Executive Development (a joint venture between IE and the Financial Times), I offer tailored courses for corporate and government clients covering topics such as corporate strategy, growth, innovation, internationalization, nonmarket management and sustainability.
 
I have worked with companies in a variety of industries including technology, energy and manufacturing such as EDP-Renewables, Gestamp, Mapfre, Sadara and stc.   
I have also been a speaker at AIG's Risk Management Academy (ARMA) since its inception in 2013 where I address clients on sources of nonmarket risk and risk mitigation strategies.
 
Published Teaching Cases
 
Xstrata and Australian Mining Tax Reform (A) (B) (co-authored with Aaron Cowper and Patrick Gatland)
  • Winner of the Best Case and Bestselling Case Awards at IE Business School

Summary: In 2010, the Australian Government announced a proposed overhaul of the taxation regime governing its large mining sector. The announcement came at a time when Australia’s mining industry was booming but concerns were also growing about how to distribute the gains of the mining boom between mining companies and the Australian people, and how to harness the success in the mining sector to promote long term sustainable economic growth across Australia. It was partly to address these concerns, as well as to improve the efficiency of the way in which mining was taxed, that the tax reform proposal was developed. At the heart of the proposal was a shift from a volume based royalty system of taxation to a system based on mining companies’ profits. The mining sector in Australia viewed the tax reform proposal negatively and anticipated that it would hurt profits and performance in the short and medium term. Focusing on Xstrata, the largest foreign mining company operating in Australia, the case charts how the mining industry acted collectively to conduct a wide-ranging and aggressive public and private lobbying campaign against the tax. Central to this campaign was the use of traditional and new media - newspapers, radio, television, Internet, and social networking sites - to try and turn public opinion against the tax.

ABB & Galindo: Stretching Managerial Responsibility during Restructuring (co-authored with Rocío Bonet and Saul Downie)

Summary: In 2011, Swiss electro-technical multinational, ABB, began taking steps to restructure its operations in Spain. The company’s efforts focused particularly on its Galindo factory in the Basque Country where it intended to liquidate the transformer manufacturing line and convert the factory into a service center. ABB offered the workers a number of well-funded options for their careers but, wanting to see manufacturing stay at Galindo, the workers in the factory strongly opposed ABB’s plans. The case outlines the legal and political steps that ABB took in order to secure government approval for the downsizing of the factory’s workforce, along with the difficult negotiations that took place between the workers and the company, which saw workers taking to the streets and social media in order to press their case for ABB to abandon its restructuring plans.

ABB & Galindo: Winning the Peace (A) (B) (co-authored with Rocío Bonet and Saul Downie)
  • Winner of the EFMD Case Writing Award, Euro-Mediterranean Managerial Practices and Issues, 2016

Summary: This is a companion case to ABB & Galindo: Stretching Managerial Responsibility during Restructuring that follows the same events from a Human Resources Management perspective. The case focuses on the dilemma of Esther, Human Resources director at the factory, when she is faced with the transition of a factory into a service center. This meant either relocating, retraining or letting go most if not all of the current workers, with the additional complication that even after the official announcement the factory still had to run for another 18 months.